Thursday, June 25, 2009

Visualisation of the Live Register Gender Gap in Ireland

Here is a visualistion of the gender gap in the Live Register (right up to May '09), courtesy of Status Ireland. Males are shown as the blue line, coming onto the register at a much faster pace than females since last summer.

5 comments:

Martin Ryan said...

A previously substantial gender gap in the Live Register began to deteriorate in the summer of 1997. As noted in the post, the gender gap began to start widening again last summer (2008).

Some notes on the gender gap in the QHNS measure of unemployment (plus another summary of the relative merits in using the QHNS to measure unemployment) are provided by Brendan Walsh
here
.

Kevin Denny said...

A really neat graph: how do you do that?

Martin Ryan said...

It's done by "Status Ireland" Kevin. There's a link to them in the main post. They've graphed lots of interesting stuff.

Kevin Denny said...

yeah i found it: impressive. You don't seem to be able to extract the numbers behind it. I am curious to see a graph of the Misery Index (inflation + unemployment)

Martin Ryan said...

It is also possible to get geographic information about Live Register registrants.
Available from the CSO here
.

Amongst counties (as at 9th june 2009), the largest percentage increase was in Limerick (+7.1%),
while the only percentage decrease was in Kerry (-1.3%). All regions showed annual increases with the largest percentage increase in the Mid-East region (+117.6%). The South-East region had the smallest percentage increase (+83.2%).

Finally, it is also worth mentioning that Philip O'Connell and Seamus McGuinness have done micro-data analysis with the LR. In Q4 2006, benefit recipients in the Northwestern region were given a questionanire and subsequently tracked for 18 months. The research by O'Connell and McGuinness is essentially concerned with the following questions:

(i) Who is likely to stay on the Live Register?
(ii) Who is likely to leave the Live Register?

Factors surrounding labour mobility, transport, health, education and labour market history show up in the results.

At the recent ESRI conference on the labour market, O'Connell and McGuinness emphasised that this work is a pilot-test; and also that profiling does not have to mean that somebody who is not targeted will not be allowed onto a labour market programme.

A link to a presentation on their work is available
here
. Scroll down to the bottom for the link.